Intel gets help from Google partnership


Intel gained an important partner in its quest to get its processors into smartphonesGoogle.

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Intel gained an important partner in its quest to get its processors into smartphonesGoogle.

The Santa Clara, Calif.-based company has yet to translate its success from personal computers — 80 percent of the world’s PCs use Intel processors — to mobile phones. Intel’s chips have been too power-hungry and have drained small batteries quickly, which has allowed processors based on a different design pioneered by U.K.-based ARM Holdings to seize control of the market. Intel is banking on a new type of chip, called Atom, that uses less power.

Intel’s mobile efforts have been plagued by setbacks, and it needed Google’s blessing to convince handset makers that its chips will work well with Google’s Android, now the world’s most popular smartphone operating software. While Android is technically “open source,” which means its code is freely available, Mountain View, Calif.-based Google exerts tight control over how versions are rolled out and which companies get early access, a policy that has prompted some complaints from the companies.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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