Eastmoreland sequoias spared from developers


Neighborhood association, Everett Custom Homes, strike deal to allow building while saving historic trees.

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BY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

The Eastermoreland Neighborhood Association and Everett Custom Homes have struck a deal to allow building while saving historic trees.

Mayor Charlie Hales’ office announced the tentative agreement:

Starting July 1, Mayor Charlie Hales negotiated with the developer to give neighbors time to raise money and buy the site.

On the week of Sept. 14, the situation came to a crisis point, with the developer ready to cut, and protesters on private property.

On Thursday, Sept. 17, the mayor’s chief of staff, Josh Alpert, contacted both sides and asked for three things:

  • All protesters off private property.
  • A stay on cutting down the trees,
  • And time for the mayor’s office to organize last-minute diplomacy.

Alpert spoke to both sides throughout the morning.

As of 1 p.m. today:

  • There is a tentative structure of a deal.
  • The trees are staying for now.
  • It is up to the neighbors to implement the deal.

The parties are not releasing details of the negotiations until they are complete. We hope to hear back from both sides by tomorrow.

The Mayor’s Office did not answer media questions about the nature of the negotiations, while the negotiations were ongoing.

A protestor climbed into the tree to delay its demise.

The neighborhood association may have a famous benefactor on its side: South Park co-creator Matt Stone.

Arthur Bradford, one of the Eastmoreland residents battling to save the huge redwoods, says developer Vic Remmers has agreed to turn the lot at Southeast 36th Avenue and Martins Street into a public space after a payment from donors including Stone, who voices the cartoon characters Kenny, Kyle and Butters. 

Bradford, who wrote about the trees last month for WW, directed a documentary about the filming of a South Park episode. He won’t say how much Stone chipped in, but says Remmers lowered his price from $900,000.

(SOURCE: Willamette Week)

 


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