Transportation Fairness Alliance holds demonstration in Pioneer Square


IMG 3367BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Portland’s cab companies urged city hall for consideration as officials weigh new rules for Uber and other ridesharing companies.

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BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Portland’s cab companies urged city hall for consideration as officials weigh new rules for Uber and ridesharing companies.

IMG 3367The Transportation Fairness Alliance, comprised of Radio Cab, Portland Taxi Cab Company, Broadway Cab, Union Cab PDX, Green Transportation and Sassy’s Cab Company, expressed concern about uniform regulations applying to the fast-charging app.  

“We’re OK with competition; we believe Portland deserves choices,” Radio Cab superintendent and TFA spokesman Noah Ernst said. “What we don’t want to see is a competitor come in and not comply by regulations and put an unlimited number of cars on the street. We think those things compromise safety.”

READ OUR PREVIOUS COVERAGE OF UBER’S PORTLAND INVASION HERE

The group in the square insisted it was not targeting one rideshare company, hashtag moniker notwithstnading, #PDXuberprotest

From the taxi supporters:

 To those a little more jaded:

Uber agreed to stop operating in Portland until early April, when the company expects a commission headed by Steve Novick to have a framework established. The message of Tuesday’s event to the commission was that cab companies would like to see what they deem to be an equitable ruling.

“Make no mistake. We know there’s a need for more taxis on the road,” said Ernst. “Portland taxi companies are currently limited to a total of 460 permits issued by the City of Portland, which means that only 460 cars can be on the road at any given time serving the entire metro area. For many years we have been asking the City of Portland to issue us additional permits. Perhaps the newly formed task force will evoke this change we’ve been seeking.”

 

 

In Boston, Uber proved it can in fact work with cities as the company and the city of Boston struck a deal allowing for greater data-sharing.

From Tech Times:

In a blog post, Uber says it will be sharing what it calls “smart data” with city officials of Boston to provide insight that will help the city create and enforce policies that will ease traffic congestion, improve public transportation, manage urban growth, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The announcement may rankle privacy advocates, which isn’t surprising, given Uber’s numerous privacy controversies in the recent past. This is why the ride-sharing company got out of its way to point out that it will be sharing anonymized trip-level data with city officials in quarterly reports.




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