Urban homesteading stores increase


An increased interest in urban homesteading and DIY activities has led to a rise in stores catering to the hobbyists’ demands.

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An increased interest in urban homesteading and DIY activities has led to a rise in stores catering to the hobbyists’ demands.

Lisa Erenyi, of House Farm, exemplifies the attitudes of many of these new entrepreneurs. She says House Farm is about building connections between customers, suppliers, the land, and the food that grows from it. “It’s highly relational, but I wouldn’t have it any other way,” she says. Her business isn’t determined by a rigid plan for growth, but is rather a reflection of the needs of her St. Johns community. Through informal conversations with customers, dialogue with Oregon suppliers, and round tables with community members, Erenyi examines her community with academic rigor and adjusts her operations accordingly. “I’m really counting on the community and the people to drive this business,” she says. Other entrepreneurs are no less assiduous in building relationships, often through classes that allow them to share their knowledge of brewing, beekeeping, and other formerly esoteric disciplines.

Read more at Neighborhood Notes.

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